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there are three exceptions -- uc-berkeley, ucla, the university of michigan, they did not garner the same amount of racial and ethnic diversity using alternatives. but what is notable is that those three universities are the ones that are most likely to draw on a national pool of applicants, which means that the number of black and hispanic students is likely to be depressed for an artificial reason. these are the schools that have to compete with other schools on an unfair playing field against competitors who are free to continue to use racial preferences in admissions. so a highly talented students of color who gets into uc- berkeley without a racial preference is also likely to be admitted to an even more competitive institution like stanford with a racial preference. it is not surprising that university of michigan, uc- berkeley, and ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions which do not to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduate school? rick sander is here from ucla law school. we will hear from him about the
administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in october 2011 he focused on the impact that
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